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Tim Hines

Principal Consultant and Practice Head

Good Product Marketing is Hard to Come By

The digital revolution has transformed how we do business, today, even the smallest companies can reach a global market, but it hasn’t all been good news. One of the by-products of the rise of the connected device has been the popularity of social media, and people now expect the bite-sized, Twitter style communications that they encourage. That is fine for letting your friends know where the latest party is, but unfortunately marketers are doing the same thing, and it really doesn’t deliver.

You need more than 140 characters for effective marketing

While it is undeniable that for any marketing the biggest available audience today is found on social media, the mistake is to think that effective marketing can be done in the same bite-sized conversations. The reality is that 140 characters simply cannot deliver the focus on customer needs and well researched value proposition that will generate real results, its quick and easy, but it’s not effective marketing, it misses the deliverables and multiple high-quality outputs focused on customer needs.

The key to effective product marketing is to listen to the market, find out what that audience really needs, and create a value offer based upon that need. That kind of research takes time and effort, a trip to Wikipedia or a Google search won’t cut it. With a solid, researched backed value offer that is based upon your audience needs, marketing should use specific focus, talking about the market and establishing your audience’s needs, and of course presenting that well-researched offer as a solution. It’s hard to accomplish all of that in a tweet.

Finding a Balance

That is why effective marketing requires balance, social media provides access to a huge audience in a way nothing really has before, and short messages have their place, but not at the expense of a more in-depth proposition. In reality, effective marketing blends both, and while the key really is that effective research and analysis, offering a deeper level of information combined with short, punchy messaging is the marketing strategy that most effectively exploits that research.